Posts by Naz Afsahi

  • In the Blog

    Eating Disorders are not just a White Feminist Issue

    July 26th, 2018     by Anita Khakh     Comments

    I developed an eating disorder at 18 years old. This was a time in my life when I was grappling with my identity, having just graduated high school, parted ways with many close friends, and unsure of what my future held. I attempted to assert control over my life by conforming to idealistic, and often unattainable, societal beauty norms marked by thinness. These efforts became the catalyst for my eating disorder and were heightened by predispositions … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Dealing With Racism Is All in a Day’s Work for Medical Professionals

    June 4th, 2018     by Amethyst Tagney     Comments

    Racism in the medical setting isn’t only experienced by patients, as explored in our previous posts. No matter how much education, training, and experience a person can acquire, sometimes people will only see skin colour, a name, or hear an accent. This prejudice exists in many institutions in Western society, especially in medicine. Like patients, BIPOC (Black Indigenous, People of Colour) medical professionals and students can also face discrimination every day from patients, peers, and … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Take Two Pills a Day and a Dose of Racism

    May 28th, 2018     by Amethyst Tagney     Comments

    Even with all the progress that has been made in civil rights and equality, prejudice and discrimination can still be found in every corner of the world. As I interact with people and see how people interact with my family on a daily basis, I wonder when our perceived ethnicities come into play in how we’re treated. When is bad customer service actually discrimination? Or, when is a denial of access to something because of … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Jo-Anne McArthur on photographing “the invisibles”

    May 7th, 2018     by Elle Côté     Comments

    This post has been updated from the original version. For most of us, stumbling upon a video of an adorable animal is something we enjoy. However, what if you decided it was your duty to show the world the animals we don’t see? For 41-year old Torontonian Jo-Anne McArthur, this is precisely the case. The photojournalist, author and educator has been travelling the world for two decades to capture what she calls “the invisibles”; animals we may … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Books for Every Child

    March 15th, 2018     by Amethyst Tagney     Comments

    Books are more than just bundles of paper with words and pictures in them. For many, they serve as a way to visit far off places, meet new people, and partake in adventures never thought possible, all as low as the cost of a library card. Reading is not just a personal experience, but a universal one as well. Although adults can find solace in a good story, they provide an even greater service to … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    One is Enough

    February 19th, 2018     by Amethyst Tagney     Comments

    “You never met your Dad before? That’s so sad,” is the response I received when I told someone I didn’t have a father in my life. That statement always confused me. Why would anyone be sad for me just because there wasn’t a father figure in my life? Sure, I’ve always wanted to have a dad because all my friends did, but not because I needed one. Even when my mom got married when I … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Racism and Colten Boushie

    February 18th, 2018     by Christine Miskonoodinkwe Smith     Comments

    Racism is defined as “the unequal treatment of a population group purely because of its possession of physical or characteristics socially defined as denoting a particular race. Racism is the deterministic belief system which sustains racialism, linking these characteristics with negatively valued social, psychological, or physical traits” (5 Satzewich). Canada is widely believed to be a tolerant society, accepting a diverse range of ethnicities, cultures and religions. Yet Canada’s relationship with Indigenous people is complex to … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Calpurnia and The Quest to Write the Truth

    February 9th, 2018     by Audrey Dwyer     Comments

    “When starting a play, I ask myself, “What’s the last play in the world I would ever want to write?” Then I force myself to write it. I do this because I’ve found that the best way to make theatre that unsettles and challenges my audience is to do things that make me uncomfortable. I work with stories that I find trite and embarrassing, I keep the development of the text as open and unstable … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    What I Am

    December 26th, 2017     by Amethyst Tagney     Comments

    My name is Amethyst, and I’m biracial. Don’t get me wrong — I love that I have multiple heritages to call my own. It means I can relate to more people since I’ve had experiences as both a Hispanic and a white individual. Since I have the dark hair and eyes of my Puerto Rican-Cuban mother and the lighter skin of my European father, I’m usually seen as one or the other. However, my physical … READ MORE

  • Tri-Radical

    October 16th, 2017     by Christarr Smillie     Comments

    ‘Growing Up Black in Canada’ is a writers’ series brought to you by Black Futures Now Toronto in partnership with Shameless Magazine. The series is meant to bring forward local and personal Black histories that do not fit into mainstream narratives about what it means to be a young person in Canada. Throughout the series we will highlight the non-fiction work of five young writers from various backgrounds. Through their stories, we will explore what … READ MORE

  • Blog Series

    My year as a Black punk-rock kid

    October 11th, 2017     by Josiane Ménard     Comments

    ‘Growing Up Black in Canada’ is a writers’ series brought to you by Black Futures Now Toronto in partnership with Shameless Magazine. The series is meant to bring forward local and personal Black histories that do not fit into mainstream narratives about what it means to be a young person in Canada. Throughout the series we will highlight the non-fiction work of five young writers from various backgrounds. Through their stories, we will explore what … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    That Time I Wrote a Play About Consent and Didn’t Know It

    October 5th, 2017     by Rose Napoli     Comments

    Content warning: Discussions of consent and situations involving sexual abuse of minors About a year ago, a wondrous thing happened to me: a theatre company wanted to produce one of my plays. Scratch that: two theatre companies wanted to join forces and produce one of my plays. In the glamorous and lucrative world of playwriting, we call this “eating dinner”. I was thrilled. I love dinner! Scratch that: I was not thrilled, really I was terrified. … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Aboriginal and Native American People: How The Media Sees Us

    September 18th, 2017     by Sara Aldred     Comments

    To most people, Native people are majestic, spiritual and, sadly, a thing of the past. Most people who don’t live in America believe that Native people are all of the above, and with the representation we receive in the media - how could one not think that? And, adding to that, a lot of the media coverage we ‘receive’, half the time Native characters are not being played by actual Native people! Being a Métis … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    história de mestiça

    September 5th, 2017     by Andrea V Barreto Lagesse     Comments

    My mother is Brazilian. My father is ethnically French, but from Mauritius Island. The two met in New York City, a place originally foreign to them both, where they worked for 14 years. Last summer, my parents and I were staying with some distant family in France. A heavy humidity stifled the town like a thick blanket, trapping the winds and radiating heat. We had only spent two days in Saint-Nazaire, but I was already beginning … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Trust Your Audience and Write Well: Roxane Gay on Writing

    August 29th, 2017     by Lauren Kirshner     Comments

    Last month I saw Roxane Gay in an on-stage interview in Toronto, where she was discussing her newest book Hunger, a powerful memoir about trauma and living in an “unruly body.” Gay was fascinating, moving, smart, and funny (as her work always is). As a creative writing teacher, I was especially excited when Gay talked about how she approaches writing. Early on in the interview, Gay discussed one of the most important decisions a writer must … READ MORE

  • Blog Series

    SHAMELESSLY WATCHING… Jane the Virgin

    August 28th, 2017     by Naz Afsahi     Comments

    To accompany our new Mental Health issue, we asked writers to share the guilty pleasure TV that brings them solace when the world gets them down. This is the second instalment in our series. READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    The Soundscapes of Self Care

    July 25th, 2017     by Jessica Kasiama     Comments

    As we continue to slip down the slope of sociopolitical turbulence, it is an act of self-care to reserve space for art that reminds us of gold beneath the rubble. It is important to hold space for art that invites us to rise. In September 2016, singer-songwriter Solange Knowles graced us with her third studio album, A Seat at the Table, and as a result, affirmed my presence during a time where I felt invisible … READ MORE

  • Blog Series

    Rhythm & Flow: How Music Shaped My Blackness

    May 20th, 2017     by Jean Boampong     Comments

    ‘Growing Up Black in Canada’ is a writers’ series brought to you by Black Futures Now Toronto in partnership with Shameless Magazine. The series is meant to bring forward local and personal Black histories that do not fit into mainstream narratives about what it means to be a young person in Canada. Throughout the series we will highlight the non-fiction work of five young writers from various backgrounds. Through their stories, we will explore what … READ MORE

  • Blog Series

    Hijab: Subtle Exclusion Remains… And It’s A Problem

    May 1st, 2017     by Sherifa Hadi     Comments

    ‘Growing Up Black in Canada’ is a writers’ series brought to you by Black Futures Now Toronto in partnership with Shameless Magazine. The series is meant to bring forward local and personal Black histories that do not fit into mainstream narratives about what it means to be a young person in Canada. Throughout the series we will highlight the non-fiction work of five young writers from various backgrounds. Through their stories, we will explore what … READ MORE

  • Blog Series

    Black Canadian Childhood

    March 30th, 2017     by Kelita Braithwaite     Comments

    ‘Growing Up Black in Canada’ is a writers’ series brought to you by Black Futures Now Toronto in partnership with Shameless Magazine. The series is meant to bring forward local and personal Black histories that do not fit into mainstream narratives about what it means to be a young person in Canada. Throughout the series we will highlight the non-fiction work of five young writers from various backgrounds. Through their stories, we will explore what … READ MORE

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