Posts by Naz Afsahi

  • In the Blog

    From Student to Stumped: How Graduating Made Me Question My Identity

    November 14th, 2019     by Alexandra Few     Comments

    Let’s throw it all the way back to kindergarten where my biggest accomplishment was correctly tracing the letter ‘e’ (I really celebrated that one). Fast forward to the start of primary school where from grades one to eight, I won the optimism award, the tenth-place ribbon in the hundred-meter dash (I’m not very athletic), and was involved in every school club. After graduating from public school, the next step was high school where I completed … READ MORE

  • Blog Series

    My Mental Health Routine

    August 15th, 2019     by Alexandra Few     Comments

    If you spend your nights falling down the YouTube rabbit hole like I do, you might be familiar with the popular video trend of morning routines. You know, those videos where the person sets up their camera equipment, presses record, hurries back to their bed, “wakes up”, and then goes through their seemingly perfect day. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy and find inspiration from these videos, and I only wish I could wake up … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    East Asian Beauty Standards

    July 12th, 2019     by Renny Jiang     Comments

    “Have you considered fixing your eyes? If you come visit me in China next summer, we can go and get you some double eyelids!” my aunt gleefully said in her signature Chinglish accent. “Hahaha…haha,” I replied awkwardly. I looked around to see if anyone heard our conversation. How could my mom and dad just continue to smile and wave when someone tells their daughter that she needs plastic surgery? Why wasn’t anyone coming to my defense … READ MORE

  • Blog Series

    The Positives of Positive Self-Talk on Mental Health

    June 25th, 2019     by Alexandra Few     Comments

    Content Warning: Discussions of anxiety Our mind has many thoughts on a day-to-day basis – experts believe around 60,000 to 80,000 a day! Many of those thoughts come to us consciously, meaning we are aware of them, and sometimes thoughts can come unconsciously, meaning they can just pop up out of nowhere. What remains constant is the pattern of our thoughts. Some folks can remain in a pattern of negative thoughts about themselves and those around … READ MORE

  • Blog Series

    Pushing Past Panic Attacks

    April 3rd, 2019     by Alexandra Few     Comments

    Content Warning: Dealing with Panic Attacks Anyone who has experienced a panic attack will tell you just how unpleasant they are. Panic attacks are different from moments of panic. Those instances where you’re frantically rushing to get somewhere so you won’t be late or that feeling you get when you lost something important, are not necessarily what you would feel during a panic attack, but some of the symptoms can be similar. Before I get into … READ MORE

  • Blog Series

    Anxiety & Technology

    March 14th, 2019     by Alexandra Few     Comments

    Content Warning: Technological ways to deal with Anxiety If you’re dealing with an anxiety disorder, you know first hand what it’s like trying to live your best life, while simultaneously having that heart racing, nauseating, “get me out of my own head” feeling that loves to attach to you like a permanent backpack. I know those feelings all too well, and for me, my anxiety will always be there. However, over the years I have figured … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    My Feelings on Catcalling

    November 30th, 2018     by R. Mahal     Comments

    Catcalling. Women all around the world have dealt with catcalling for as long as we can remember. Before we even knew what objectifying was, it was happening to us. Doing the simplest of things, like walking in the mall, or going to the movie theatre with some friends, we would hear whistling or degrading comments. It is a reality for a number of people, of all colours, religions, shapes, sizes, sexual orientations, etc., and not … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Learn The Art of Audio Storytelling

    October 12th, 2018     by Mariel Marshall     Comments

    As access to recording and editing technologies proliferate, the medium is becoming democratized. But opportunities to access quality training are few and far between. FIXT POINT Arts & Media is piloting a new training program that will give young women and non-binary youth the knowledge and practical skills they need to produce high-quality, compelling audio stories, and teach them how to use the medium of audio storytelling to engage their communities in meaningful ways. The two-week … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Eating Disorders are not just a White Feminist Issue

    July 26th, 2018     by Anita Khakh     Comments

    I developed an eating disorder at 18 years old. This was a time in my life when I was grappling with my identity, having just graduated high school, parted ways with many close friends, and unsure of what my future held. I attempted to assert control over my life by conforming to idealistic, and often unattainable, societal beauty norms marked by thinness. These efforts became the catalyst for my eating disorder and were heightened by predispositions … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Dealing With Racism Is All in a Day’s Work for Medical Professionals

    June 4th, 2018     by Amethyst Tagney     Comments

    Racism in the medical setting isn’t only experienced by patients, as explored in our previous posts. No matter how much education, training, and experience a person can acquire, sometimes people will only see skin colour, a name, or hear an accent. This prejudice exists in many institutions in Western society, especially in medicine. Like patients, BIPOC (Black Indigenous, People of Colour) medical professionals and students can also face discrimination every day from patients, peers, and … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Take Two Pills a Day and a Dose of Racism

    May 28th, 2018     by Amethyst Tagney     Comments

    Even with all the progress that has been made in civil rights and equality, prejudice and discrimination can still be found in every corner of the world. As I interact with people and see how people interact with my family on a daily basis, I wonder when our perceived ethnicities come into play in how we’re treated. When is bad customer service actually discrimination? Or, when is a denial of access to something because of … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Jo-Anne McArthur on photographing “the invisibles”

    May 7th, 2018     by Elle Côté     Comments

    This post has been updated from the original version. For most of us, stumbling upon a video of an adorable animal is something we enjoy. However, what if you decided it was your duty to show the world the animals we don’t see? For 41-year old Torontonian Jo-Anne McArthur, this is precisely the case. The photojournalist, author and educator has been travelling the world for two decades to capture what she calls “the invisibles”; animals we may … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Books for Every Child

    March 15th, 2018     by Amethyst Tagney     Comments

    Books are more than just bundles of paper with words and pictures in them. For many, they serve as a way to visit far off places, meet new people, and partake in adventures never thought possible, all as low as the cost of a library card. Reading is not just a personal experience, but a universal one as well. Although adults can find solace in a good story, they provide an even greater service to … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    One is Enough

    February 19th, 2018     by Amethyst Tagney     Comments

    “You never met your Dad before? That’s so sad,” is the response I received when I told someone I didn’t have a father in my life. That statement always confused me. Why would anyone be sad for me just because there wasn’t a father figure in my life? Sure, I’ve always wanted to have a dad because all my friends did, but not because I needed one. Even when my mom got married when I … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Racism and Colten Boushie

    February 18th, 2018     by Christine Miskonoodinkwe Smith     Comments

    Racism is defined as “the unequal treatment of a population group purely because of its possession of physical or characteristics socially defined as denoting a particular race. Racism is the deterministic belief system which sustains racialism, linking these characteristics with negatively valued social, psychological, or physical traits” (5 Satzewich). Canada is widely believed to be a tolerant society, accepting a diverse range of ethnicities, cultures and religions. Yet Canada’s relationship with Indigenous people is complex to … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Calpurnia and The Quest to Write the Truth

    February 9th, 2018     by Audrey Dwyer     Comments

    “When starting a play, I ask myself, “What’s the last play in the world I would ever want to write?” Then I force myself to write it. I do this because I’ve found that the best way to make theatre that unsettles and challenges my audience is to do things that make me uncomfortable. I work with stories that I find trite and embarrassing, I keep the development of the text as open and unstable … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    What I Am

    December 26th, 2017     by Amethyst Tagney     Comments

    My name is Amethyst, and I’m biracial. Don’t get me wrong — I love that I have multiple heritages to call my own. It means I can relate to more people since I’ve had experiences as both a Hispanic and a white individual. Since I have the dark hair and eyes of my Puerto Rican-Cuban mother and the lighter skin of my European father, I’m usually seen as one or the other. However, my physical … READ MORE

  • Tri-Radical

    October 16th, 2017     by Christarr Smillie     Comments

    ‘Growing Up Black in Canada’ is a writers’ series brought to you by Black Futures Now Toronto in partnership with Shameless Magazine. The series is meant to bring forward local and personal Black histories that do not fit into mainstream narratives about what it means to be a young person in Canada. Throughout the series we will highlight the non-fiction work of five young writers from various backgrounds. Through their stories, we will explore what … READ MORE

  • Blog Series

    My year as a Black punk-rock kid

    October 11th, 2017     by Josiane Ménard     Comments

    ‘Growing Up Black in Canada’ is a writers’ series brought to you by Black Futures Now Toronto in partnership with Shameless Magazine. The series is meant to bring forward local and personal Black histories that do not fit into mainstream narratives about what it means to be a young person in Canada. Throughout the series we will highlight the non-fiction work of five young writers from various backgrounds. Through their stories, we will explore what … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    That Time I Wrote a Play About Consent and Didn’t Know It

    October 5th, 2017     by Rose Napoli     Comments

    Content warning: Discussions of consent and situations involving sexual abuse of minors About a year ago, a wondrous thing happened to me: a theatre company wanted to produce one of my plays. Scratch that: two theatre companies wanted to join forces and produce one of my plays. In the glamorous and lucrative world of playwriting, we call this “eating dinner”. I was thrilled. I love dinner! Scratch that: I was not thrilled, really I was terrified. … READ MORE

← Older