• In the Blog

    Jo-Anne McArthur on photographing “the invisibles”

    May 7th, 2018     by Elle Côté     Comments

    For most of us, stumbling upon a video of a puppy or kitten is something we enjoy. However, what if you decided it was your duty to show the world the animals we don’t normally see? For 40-year old Torontonian Jo-Anne McArthur, this is precisely the case. The photojournalist, author, and educator has been travelling the world for almost two decades to capture what she calls “the invisibles”; animals we may not consider on a regular … READ MORE

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    Fun Home: A Conversation with Sara Farb

    April 26th, 2018     by Michelle Schwartz     Comments

    Fun Home, the musical based on the graphic memoir by Dykes to Watch Out For cartoonist, Alison Bechdel, is on stage now in Toronto. The show features three actresses playing the role of Alison Bechdel – as a young girl (Small Alison), as a university student (Medium Alison), and as a forty-something woman (Alison). We spoke with Sara Farb, who plays Medium Alison. READ MORE

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    Go Make Your Web Series!

    April 3rd, 2018     by Melanie Butler     Comments

    “Go make your movie. We need your movie. I need your movie. So go make it.” -Greta Gerwig, The Oscars – Represent Montage, 2018 READ MORE

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    A Letter to Stephon Clark’s Family

    March 27th, 2018     by Nisa Dang     Comments

    The author of the following letter, Nisa Dang, is an activist, and a political organizer around gun control, abolition, and voter disenfranchisement. She is also from South Sacramento. Here is her message, and her promise, to the Clark family. READ MORE

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    Books for Every Child

    March 15th, 2018     by Amethyst Tagney     Comments

    Books are more than just bundles of paper with words and pictures in them. For many, they serve as a way to visit far off places, meet new people, and partake in adventures never thought possible, all as low as the cost of a library card. Reading is not just a personal experience, but a universal one as well. Although adults can find solace in a good story, they provide an even greater service to … READ MORE

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    One is Enough

    February 19th, 2018     by Amethyst Tagney     Comments

    “You never met your Dad before? That’s so sad,” is the response I received when I told someone I didn’t have a father in my life. That statement always confused me. Why would anyone be sad for me just because there wasn’t a father figure in my life? Sure, I’ve always wanted to have a dad because all my friends did, but not because I needed one. Even when my mom got married when I … READ MORE

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    Racism and Colten Boushie

    February 18th, 2018     by Christine Miskonoodinkwe Smith     Comments

    Racism is defined as “the unequal treatment of a population group purely because of its possession of physical or characteristics socially defined as denoting a particular race. Racism is the deterministic belief system which sustains racialism, linking these characteristics with negatively valued social, psychological, or physical traits” (5 Satzewich). Canada is widely believed to be a tolerant society, accepting a diverse range of ethnicities, cultures and religions. Yet Canada’s relationship with Indigenous people is complex to … READ MORE

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    Calpurnia and The Quest to Write the Truth

    February 9th, 2018     by Audrey Dwyer     Comments

    “When starting a play, I ask myself, “What’s the last play in the world I would ever want to write?” Then I force myself to write it. I do this because I’ve found that the best way to make theatre that unsettles and challenges my audience is to do things that make me uncomfortable. I work with stories that I find trite and embarrassing, I keep the development of the text as open and unstable … READ MORE

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    Non Binary World Building with M Téllez

    January 18th, 2018     by Estraven Lupino-Smith     Comments

    M is a member of the Philadelphia-based collective METROPOLARITY, a sci-fi and speculative fiction group that, in their words, uses writing to ride against empire. While I was living in Philadelphia I got into M’s writing through their zine about cyborgs navigating dystopia called All That’s Left. I loved this zine because it re-ignited the old sci-fi nerd in me while opening up new possibilities for queer, trans and non-binary worlds. Interviewing them was a great chance to reconnect and speak about science fiction, binaries, and writing your dreams. READ MORE

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    Aftermathematics

    January 17th, 2018     by Anonymous     Comments

    Content Warning: This piece contains discussion of sexual assault and its aftermath, trauma, psychiatry, and includes misogynist and homophobic language. READ MORE

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    “I wish work like this existed in Toronto!” - A conversation with Julia Cratchley

    January 15th, 2018     by Michelle Schwartz     Comments

    Julia Cratchley is the Artistic Director of the Transcendance Project, a contemporary dance company based in Toronto. Starting out as a dancer in a fine arts high school in Richmond Hill, Ontario, she’s gone on to dance and choreograph shows with companies across Canada. Julia is the creator, director, and choreographer for Eve of St. George, an immersive recreation of Bram Stoker’s Dracula, inspired by Sleep No More, an immersive show still playing in New York. In immersive theatre, the audience wanders through the set, choosing their own path and even interacting with the performers. Each audience member’s experience of the show is unique. Eve of St. George will be taking over four levels of the Great Hall in Toronto at the end of the month. We spoke with Julia Cratchley about her artistic process and the creation of Eve of St. George. READ MORE

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    Chelsea Martin’s Caca Dolce: Essays for a Shitty Era

    January 3rd, 2018     by Marta Balcewicz     Comments

    Earlier this year, a New Yorker article called “The Personal-Essay Boom Is Over” sparked a heated debate on the truth of its title’s claim. In short, the author, Jia Tolentino, argued that personal essays, the kind written mostly by women, often young women, often writers who are just starting out and who do not get paid much for the online publication of said personal essay, and whose said personal essay focuses on the deeply, often shockingly, personal (Tolentino gives the example of an essay published by Jezebel about a tampon lost inside the author’s body), are a thing of the past. READ MORE

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    What I Am

    December 26th, 2017     by Amethyst Tagney     Comments

    My name is Amethyst, and I’m biracial. Don’t get me wrong — I love that I have multiple heritages to call my own. It means I can relate to more people since I’ve had experiences as both a Hispanic and a white individual. Since I have the dark hair and eyes of my Puerto Rican-Cuban mother and the lighter skin of my European father, I’m usually seen as one or the other. However, my physical … READ MORE

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    What it Means to be a Working Student

    December 19th, 2017     by Erin Calhoun     Comments

    There is one thing that is never simple: money. As a college or university student, things only become more daunting with tuition invoices, rent, bills, and other income-absorbing expenses. Students often hold part-time jobs to accumulate income during their studies; for low-income students this is often essential. Desperate enough, students sometimes enter into stressful and toxic work environments. READ MORE

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    Past, Present, Futures – Indigenous Futurism by Youth Filmmakers

    November 18th, 2017     by Jackie Mlotek     Comments

    The only way to survive is to imagine futures, but it’s even better to create them. Visualizing futures is power. Giving shape to future worlds that aren’t separate from the past, but inextricable to them is what can get us through. This is the gift the young filmmakers at imagiNATIVE explored through their films. imagiNATIVE is an annual film festival held in Toronto every October. imagiNATIVE’s vision is about showcasing, promoting, and celebrating Indigenous film and … READ MORE

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    Rupi Rising: In Defense of (Shamelessly) Loving Instagram Poetry

    October 17th, 2017     by Tita Kyrtsakas     Comments

    After a number of conversations with colleagues, friends, and family, and reviewing online comments, I find that people either adore Kaur’s minimalist style of art or they shake with disapproval. The latter seem to express a similar attitude: this type of writing isn’t “real” poetry, or “I could write that,” or it’s already been done/said. In school, you may have learned about haiku and rhyme pattern, imagery and alliteration. These are important for understanding poetry’s structure, or for an introduction to what poetry has been in the past. But I’d like to consider: how do we define poetry? READ MORE

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    That Time I Wrote a Play About Consent and Didn’t Know It

    October 5th, 2017     by Rose Napoli     Comments

    Content warning: Discussions of consent and situations involving sexual abuse of minors About a year ago, a wondrous thing happened to me: a theatre company wanted to produce one of my plays. Scratch that: two theatre companies wanted to join forces and produce one of my plays. In the glamorous and lucrative world of playwriting, we call this “eating dinner”. I was thrilled. I love dinner! Scratch that: I was not thrilled, really I was terrified. … READ MORE

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    Fat Positivity for the Unapologetic

    October 3rd, 2017     by NiaZamar     Comments

    Recently in the media Black women’s bodies in particular have been under high scrutiny. If you Google Beyoncé or Rihanna right now much of what shows up is focused on their bodies and the changes they are going through. It is clear that Fat is still deemed as a bad word. The internet memes implying that Quantasia Sharpton is too fat to have possibly slept with Usher reveal how much our society literally steals away desirability and humanity from fat women. All the memes implying Rihanna must be pregnant as a way of explaining her recent weight gain are a sad reminder that while the body positivity movement is in full effect we still need a more comprehensive conversation around Fat positivity, one that includes sexual health, desirability and awareness around consent. READ MORE

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    Aboriginal and Native American People: How The Media Sees Us

    September 18th, 2017     by Sara Aldred     Comments

    To most people, Native people are majestic, spiritual and, sadly, a thing of the past. Most people who don’t live in America believe that Native people are all of the above, and with the representation we receive in the media - how could one not think that? And, adding to that, a lot of the media coverage we ‘receive’, half the time Native characters are not being played by actual Native people! Being a Métis … READ MORE

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    história de mestiça

    September 5th, 2017     by Andrea V Barreto Lagesse     Comments

    My mother is Brazilian. My father is ethnically French, but from Mauritius Island. The two met in New York City, a place originally foreign to them both, where they worked for 14 years. Last summer, my parents and I were staying with some distant family in France. A heavy humidity stifled the town like a thick blanket, trapping the winds and radiating heat. We had only spent two days in Saint-Nazaire, but I was already beginning … READ MORE

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