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Sports series: On learning how to ride a bike

August 2nd, 2013     by Guest Blogger     Comments

by Rezwana Bhuiyan


I learned how to ride a bike when I was thirteen years old. It was my younger brother who taught me. A reversal of the usual order of things (wherein an older sibling teaches a younger one). The impulse to learn how to ride a bike was sudden and inexplicable, for up to that point in my life, I had resigned myself to the idea that I was unathletic and poor at sports.

Back in elementary school, I used to dread having to participate in the mandatory track and field tournaments held every year. The reason why was that I frequently lagged behind the others. I perceived myself as slow which took a toll on how I felt about myself. Nevertheless, I wanted to be more athletic. I wanted to be fast.

It took me a couple of days to learn how to ride a bike. I fell quite a lot and had a hard time grasping the sense of balance that my brother told me was key. At last, I was able to grasp it. That sense of balance-that indescribable feeling where after struggling and struggling to not topple over, one is at last able to-albeit shakily-ride straight.

I recall that discovery feeling, like finding the solution to a difficult problem. It was like I had come across an answer that had always been there, that once I learnt, I would never forget.

Once I got the hang of riding a bike, I rode everywhere. The wind felt great, as did the sensation of weightlessness one gets when biking quickly across smooth asphalt. I felt as if I could go anywhere on my bike. I could be free and fast at last.

After learning how to ride a bike, I became considerably more active. That taste of success wet my appetite for more athletic activities. However, I did not spontaneously become great at sports. I still had moments where I felt like I was lagging behind. Nevertheless, what I gained the most from learning how to ride a bike was the understanding that with hard work and perseverance I could eventually succeed at anything that I tried. I gained confidence and the motivation to press on.


Rezwana Bhuiyan is a Bangladeshi Canadian living in Toronto, Ontario. She has recently transferred to York University for her second year of undergraduate studies. There, she will be working towards earning a BA in English. She has a passion for reading and writing, as well as drawing. She currently has a webcomic in the works.

Tags: guest blogs, sporting goods

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