Tag: Body Politics

  • Embrace the Fail

    August 25th, 2015     by Victoria Chiu     Comments

    I’ve always had a thing about failure. Maybe it’s because of the standards imposed on me by years gone by of attending an old chartered school, or because of the general pressure stereotypical “Asian parents” supposedly exert on their kids. One of the prevailing stereotypes about Asian cultures is that parents stipulate high expectations for their children, and oftentimes this means that anything less than “absolute success” essentially equates to failure. Hence whenever my friends get a 98% on an exam, they’ll joke about what their parents will ask: “What happened to the other 2%?” READ MORE

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    Denise’s Test, Part 2: More Positive Media Depictions of People of Size

    August 24th, 2015     by Denise Reich     Comments

    As I continue to search for positive depictions of people of size on stage and screen, I’ve come up with several more examples. As a reminder, to pass Denise’s Test the character of size must be treated like any other person on the show. They might be villains or heroes and they might be loved or loathed by the audience, but they’re not there in the context of a stereotype or joke. They’re not a) a stock “villainous glutton” or a related trope; b) they’re not the token “funny fat guy” who exists only for comic relief, and c) their existence is neither defined nor dominated by obsession or contentious relationships with food. Part 2 continues to focus on people of size that appear as main or supporting characters. READ MORE

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    Carless in North America: Ten examples of disadvantage in public transportation

    August 17th, 2015     by Denise Reich     Comments

    A recent Buzzfeed quiz about privilege asked an interesting question: if the reader had to rely on public transportation. It’s an issue that doesn’t seem to be brought up very much, but perhaps it should be. While mass transit is fast and efficient in many parts of the world, if you don’t have your own vehicle you’re at an extreme disadvantage in many parts of North America. The challenges can be substantial, particularly for women, the disabled, and the elderly. READ MORE

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    What’s in a Desi identity?

    July 29th, 2015     by Shailee Koranne     Comments

    Desi people are those who are a part of the diaspora. The diaspora is made up of South-Asians who are living outside of South-Asia. I suppose you might have heard about Bobby Jindal, a prominent Republican politician, running for President of the United States in the primaries. Jindal, who is currently serving as governor of Louisiana, is an Indian-American – a Desi. In his announcement speech, Bobby said, “I’m done with all this talk about hyphenated Americans. … READ MORE

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    Purple Monsters on Parade: Five Things (this) Chronically Ill Person Would Like You to Know

    July 16th, 2015     by Denise Reich     Comments

    Navigating life with a chronic or long-term condition can be challenging. Understanding how to relate to a friend or relative who is chronically ill can similarly be daunting. It’s not always easy to understand what your loved one is experiencing, no matter how well you know them. What would I like my friends and family to know? READ MORE

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    Mid-Week Round Up: July 15

    July 15th, 2015     by Jessie Hale     Comments

    Check out what’s making been making our headlines this week. READ MORE

  • Welcome to SuperMutant Magic Academy – Where You’re More Normal than Weird

    July 14th, 2015     by Kaitlin Tremblay     Comments

    SuperMutant Magic Academy, written by Jillian Tamaki and published by Drawn & Quarterly, is a charming look at the quirks and nuances of high-school life – without complicating the realistic portrayals of relationships and growing up by forcing them to fit into the constraint of an over-arching plot. READ MORE

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    Denise’s Test: In search of fair media depictions of people of size

    July 13th, 2015     by Denise Reich     Comments

    It’s not particularly common to find fat people depicted in a positive light in films and television shows. They’re far more likely to be cast as unpleasant characters, and in the instances where they’re actually given a lot of screen time, it’s often for comic relief. And of course, they’re frequently depicted eating a lot. Everyone knows about the Bechdel Test for depictions of women in media. I couldn’t find anything similar about fair depictions of people of size, so I developed my own test. READ MORE

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    Mid-Week Round Up: June 11

    June 11th, 2015     by Caitlin Blennerhassett     Comments

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    The Power of Dancing Man

    June 4th, 2015     by Denise Reich     Comments

    Several months ago Sean O’Brien, a heavyset financier from Liverpool, England, was mocked while he was dancing at a club. To add insult to injury, the trolls snapped two photos of him –one where he was dancing, and a second where he was looking dejectedly at the ground after he’d stopped – and posted them online with derogatory commentary. In everyday circumstances, perhaps that’s where the story would have ended. Here’s where the story gets interesting: this time, it didn’t fly. READ MORE

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    Farewell, Aunt Flo

    May 29th, 2015     by Denise Reich     Comments

    I first got my period when I was 11 years old. It was a surprise to everyone, including me. I’d always been one of the shortest and smallest girls in my class; I hadn’t reached visible puberty early. Almost overnight, though, it seemed that I’d been visited by the Breast Fairy, and she’d dragged along my period as a little bit of extra pixie dust. READ MORE

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    Mid-Week Round Up: May 21

    May 21st, 2015     by Jessie Hale     Comments

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    Do-It-Yourself Smut: Writing the Erotic

    April 9th, 2015     by Danielle Gehl     Comments

    A couple years ago, I ran a workshop called “Writing Our Desires: DIY Literotica.” I was thrilled and happily scandalized by the way folks threw themselves into the discussion and activities, calling out sexy words and body parts and constructing scenarios and storylines that made other participants go “Oooh.” The workshop confirmed my suspicion that lots of us want to write smut and will gladly do so when given the time and space. Erotic writing can take the form of fiction, journaling, songs, poems, love letters, sexts and more. If you can write simple sentences, you can write erotica. I dare you to try. READ MORE

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    Four Things Never to Say to (this) Chronically Ill Friend

    March 30th, 2015     by Denise Reich     Comments

    Since autumn, I’ve been home with a serious viral illness. There’s a lot I could write about my experience: the endless battles with my HMO for appropriate care; how much I’m really envying citizens of countries with universal health care; the indifferent doctors; my fears about my condition. Fortunately, many friends and family members have been very supportive of me. Unfortunately, not everyone has been helpful. It’s led me to compile this list of the top four things they’ve said to completely piss me off. READ MORE

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    Mid-Week Round Up: February March 18

    March 18th, 2015     by Jessie Hale     Comments

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    Mid-Week Round Up: March 11

    March 11th, 2015     by Jessie Hale     Comments

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    Mid-Week Round Up: February 25

    February 25th, 2015     by Ronak Ghorbani     Comments

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    Mid-Week Round Up: February 18

    February 18th, 2015     by Jessie Hale     Comments

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    Fat Girl at the 5K: Five truths for runners and walkers of size

    January 22nd, 2015     by Denise Reich     Comments

    Running and racewalking are more inclusive for fat participants than many other sports, at least on some level. While many folks choose to turn races into social events and run with their friends, for many others, it’s a very solitary pursuit. The other runners aren’t really particularly concerned about you or what you look like, because they’re focused on their own game. However, as in just about everything, sizeism does creep into running culture in major ways. READ MORE

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    “Education is the passport to the future”: On Mental Health, Privilege and Access in Academia

    January 20th, 2015     by Nadia Siu Van     Comments

    Is the treatment of mental health in academia a serious structural issue rather than an anecdotal one? And if so, why is no one discussing it? READ MORE

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