Tag: Body Politics

  • Announcements

    Shameless Suspends Shipping In Solidarity With Striking Postal Workers

    October 29th, 2018     by Team Shameless     Comments

    Dear Shameless Readers and Subscribers, Hi there! I’m Angela, Shameless’ Circulation Manager. Usually I am happily behind the scenes here tapping away at my (multiple) spreadsheets, keeping track of subscriptions, filling orders, and hand-addressing many, many envelopes. Today, though, I want to let you know why some of you who’ve placed recent orders haven’t received them yet. Earlier this week, Canadian Union of Postal Workers and Canada Post failed to reach a deal. As a … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Review: Motherhood by Sheila Heti

    July 11th, 2018     by Marta Balcewicz     Comments

    Early in the novel Motherhood (published this May by Knopf Canada), Sheila Heti’s narrator provides a summary of the Biblical story of Jacob wresting the angel. In this story, a creature appears to Jacob, proceeds to wrestle with him overnight, and, come morning, spares Jacob and renames him “Israel.” Jacob calls the wrestling place “Peniel,” and refers to it as the spot where he came face to face with God, and made it out alive. Heti’s novel ends with the story of Jacob and the angel as well, except now it is a reference to the book the narrator has just finished writing. The narrator—a woman close to 40 years of age, living in Toronto, a fairly successful writer—comes to see her book as the wrestling ring where she faced God and made it out alive. She names this place Motherhood. READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Dealing With Racism Is All in a Day’s Work for Medical Professionals

    June 4th, 2018     by Amethyst Tagney     Comments

    Racism in the medical setting isn’t only experienced by patients, as explored in our previous posts. No matter how much education, training, and experience a person can acquire, sometimes people will only see skin colour, a name, or hear an accent. This prejudice exists in many institutions in Western society, especially in medicine. Like patients, BIPOC (Black Indigenous, People of Colour) medical professionals and students can also face discrimination every day from patients, peers, and … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Take Two Pills a Day and a Dose of Racism

    May 28th, 2018     by Amethyst Tagney     Comments

    Even with all the progress that has been made in civil rights and equality, prejudice and discrimination can still be found in every corner of the world. As I interact with people and see how people interact with my family on a daily basis, I wonder when our perceived ethnicities come into play in how we’re treated. When is bad customer service actually discrimination? Or, when is a denial of access to something because of … READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Fat Positivity for the Unapologetic

    October 3rd, 2017     by NiaZamar     Comments

    Recently in the media Black women’s bodies in particular have been under high scrutiny. If you Google Beyoncé or Rihanna right now much of what shows up is focused on their bodies and the changes they are going through. It is clear that Fat is still deemed as a bad word. The internet memes implying that Quantasia Sharpton is too fat to have possibly slept with Usher reveal how much our society literally steals away desirability and humanity from fat women. All the memes implying Rihanna must be pregnant as a way of explaining her recent weight gain are a sad reminder that while the body positivity movement is in full effect we still need a more comprehensive conversation around Fat positivity, one that includes sexual health, desirability and awareness around consent. READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Here’s how you can help a friend struggling with depression

    May 31st, 2017     by Molly Kay     Comments

    Learning how to be a good support system when you don’t understand what they’re going through READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    My Name, My Identity

    March 14th, 2017     by Denise Reich     Comments

    I recently learned about the My Name, My Identity initiative. This campaign, created by the Santa Clara County Office of Education in California, USA, invites teachers and school districts to commit to saying students’ names correctly and fostering diversity in the classroom. The project also includes a social media hashtag, #mynamemyid, and encourages youth to share the stories and significance of their names. READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Accessible Organizing Means…

    March 8th, 2017     by Denise Reich     Comments

    Did you participate in the Women’s March on January 21st? Many of us did – millions, in fact, in countries across the globe. But did all of us make it to the march, or feel included there? Before the march, in an article for TheEstablishment.com, Emily Ladau pointed out that disability was mentioned exactly twice in the Women’s March’s platform. One of those mentions referred to caring for and chronic illnesses as a “burden.” Yep. READ MORE

  • Lyn Mikel Brown: Powered by Girl Review

    December 6th, 2016     by Kaitlin Tremblay     Comments

    Growing up, I was raised by my mom, a single mom who was going back to school to become a nurse, while also raising three very rambunctious children. My mom is a loving, compassionate woman, but she also is a fighter. She taught me so much, like how to stand up for myself and others when people and systems were unfair. She taught me that it is okay to be angry, and how to use this anger to try and make things better. READ MORE

  • Body Dysmorphia

    August 24th, 2016     by Urooj Mirza     Comments

    Content warning: sexual assault, fat phobia- Body dysmorphia is an open letter to Victoria’s Secret READ MORE

  • Blog Series

    Berry Picking Blackfoot: Appropriative Allyship

    July 5th, 2016     by Lauren Crazybull     Comments

    Content Warning: This piece talks about violence against indigenous peoples, and mentions the murder of family members. I fell out of love with a certain type of activism at a rally I organized in my community that was for indigenous women. The event was clear in its objective: to protest how the “Justice” system treats indigenous women. Since activism is framed in a way that highlights taking down oppressive systems, I didn’t expect oppressive systems to exist within activist circles – but it sure does… READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    A Tale of Two Doctors

    June 20th, 2016     by Denise Reich     Comments

    Monday: I’m waiting to see one of my specialists. He has the results of my pulmonary function tests in my file, but never shares them with me. He actually has to be reminded to compare my new PFTs to the previous ones. If I ask him for numbers, he’s evasive. His techs tell me they’ve been instructed not to give patients their data. His office claims that they can’t give my medical records directly to me, which is a violation of both USA and state law. READ MORE

  • MOGA: the new ethical headscarf brand empowering women and supporting education in pakistan

    June 16th, 2016     by Dani Leever     Comments

    There are currently 5.1 million Pakistani children of primary school age who are out of school, according to the organisation CARE Pakistan. Of the poorest 20% of the population, two out of three young women do not go to school – it is one of the more severe situations for women’s education in the world. READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    If…Not When

    June 9th, 2016     by Denise Reich     Comments

    I recently attended a public event intended to foster body positivism and self-esteem. Several brave and powerful speakers shared their experiences, insights and perspectives with the crowd. However, one presentation by a young woman made my spirits drop within three sentences. “I was worried,” she said, in a voice that promised gloom and doom, “that I was going to be single. Forever.” She paused dramatically. “With lots of cats.” READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    WEEKLY ROUND UP: JUNE 6

    June 6th, 2016     by Ronak Ghorbani     Comments

    Check out what’s making been making our headlines this week. READ MORE

  • Blog Series

    Berry Picking Blackfoot: An Introduction

    May 10th, 2016     by Lauren Crazybull     Comments

    My name is Lauren Crazybull. I am a Blackfoot and Dene Artist and Activist residing in Lethbridge, Alberta. I pursue art independently and make a point to create things… constantly. And this column will be yet another. READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    WEEKLY ROUND UP: APRIL 8

    April 8th, 2016     by Ronak Ghorbani     Comments

    Check out what’s making been making our headlines this week. READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Writing: A Potent Healing Modality

    March 29th, 2016     by Ruby Talon     Comments

    With a bit of time and perspective, I realized I’d never want any of my friends to feel helpless when it came to their health and their body like that. So I quit the program and decided I had to shift my focus away from all the confusion instead of trying to figure it all out and try to become a different person—that way just felt impossible. READ MORE

    Content warning: This blog contains personal information about eating disorder treatment. READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    WEEKLY ROUND UP: MARCH 24

    March 25th, 2016     by Caitlin Blennerhassett     Comments

    Check out what’s making been making our headlines this week. READ MORE

  • In the Blog

    Weekly Round Up: March 12

    March 12th, 2016     by Ronak Ghorbani     Comments

    Check out what’s making been making our headlines this week. READ MORE

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