• In the Blog

    The Gut

    January 20th, 2021     by Camille Côté     Comments

    Camille Côté shares her experiences through creative non-fiction about looking back on the importance of listening to your body. In the midst of an unhealthy relationship, intense family changes and illness, and just trying to get through the day as a young person and comedian in her early 20’s, Camille struggled with the dissonance of trying to ignore her gut and how important it is to listen to what your body is trying to tell you. Content warning for mentions of drug use. READ MORE

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    Depression, Debt, and Disparities: How Women’s Finances Affect Their Mental Health

    January 10th, 2021     by Ainsley Lawrence     Comments

    Finances are about far more than one’s standard of living. They mean more than just having the luxury of going out and buying that designer handbag you’ve had your eye on or making sure you’re getting around town in a truly tricked-out ride. Financial issues are, fundamentally, a matter of social justice. And, increasingly, they’re linked to overall quality of life. Economic disparities are being linked to health disparities. This includes not only inequities in access … READ MORE

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    How To Eat Ethically After An Eating Disorder

    December 28th, 2020     by Isabel Armiento     Comments

    But first, a classic chicken and egg problem: “Are vegetarian diets a risk factor for disordered eating, or – and research strongly favours this option – do those at risk of eating disorders gravitate towards vegetarian diets?” READ MORE

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    “I Woke Up Like This”: The Beauty Industry, Gaslighting, And The Bravery Of Loving Yourself

    November 28th, 2020     by Victoria Sagardía Calderón     Comments

    “The way women have been taught to tear each other down does not actually benefit us. If we want to create supportive spaces, our only option is sisterhood — and unfollowing accounts that don’t support our mental health. One of the best things we can do to improve our body image is to curate our Instagram feeds.” READ MORE

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    A Brief History of Drag: From 618 A.D to COVID-19

    November 14th, 2020     by Maighdlin Mahoney     Comments

    “Drag is something that people have been doing in their bedrooms forever,” says Holliday, and now more than ever performers and audiences can engage with drag even when they’re isolated. READ MORE

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    To Those Who Have Painted My World Orange

    October 12th, 2020     by Ruby Condon     Comments

    A love letter for pandemic times. READ MORE

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    The Long History of Defunding the Police

    September 24th, 2020     by Maighdlin Mahoney     Comments

    Over the last few months, we’ve been hearing the call to defund the police more and more. In fact, defunding the police is really only one piece in a decades old (even centuries old) movement to get rid of police and prisons entirely – this movement is called prison abolition. Read on to learn more about the history of prison abolition and how you can get involved! READ MORE

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    The Problem With Detox Talk: How to Build a Self Caring Yoga Practice During Quarantine

    August 23rd, 2020     by Victoria Sagardía Calderón     Comments

    “Since quarantine began, a wide range of yogis – from popular influencers to local yoga teachers – have persistently argued for the importance of keeping or creating a yoga practice to handle stress levels during quarantine. Many of these teachers, however, also started to market from a weight loss perspective, and sport slogans like “lose the quarantine 15.” This, combined with the indirect messaging of what a yoga body “should” look like (online yoga accounts often show just one type of body: thin, white, and clad in expensive yoga wear), very quickly turned into a conversation about how yoga could make you into a superhero mermaid with a six-pack.” READ MORE

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    Banding Together Through Mutual Aid

    August 21st, 2020     by Ainsley Lawrence     Comments

    “Ironically, as social isolation is encouraged for the sake of public health, it is small, united groups of people that may ultimately thrive.” READ MORE

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    Five Black Writers You Should Know

    August 18th, 2020     by Team Shameless     Comments

    In the spirit of continuing to highlight Black voices and perspectives, the Shameless team has compiled some of our favourite pieces written by Black authors over the past few months. Here are five Black writers we think you should know. READ MORE

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    Surviving the Pandemic Together: Investing in Our Communities’ Futures

    May 23rd, 2020     by Team Shameless     Comments

    In the months leading up to the pandemic, the Shameless team was planning to launch a fundraising campaign to counteract the loss of our Ontario Arts Council funding. Our priorities in the current moment have shifted. We’ve found ourselves asking, how can we maintain our treasured communities through primarily online forms? How can we show up for each other when we have to socialize from a distance? How can we continue to create the world that we want to find on the other side of all of this? READ MORE

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    Rust Belt Femme: An Interview with author Raechel Anne Jolie

    April 19th, 2020     by Andi Schwartz     Comments

    “The Rust Belt gave me my femme identity more wholly, and more fully, and more beautifully than anything else.” READ MORE

    Author Raechel Anne Jolie talks to us about growing up in the Rust Belt, becoming femme, and writing a memoir about it all. READ MORE

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    How STD Stigma Shapes the Masses

    March 12th, 2020     by Jori Hamilton     Comments

    Please note this post contains some spoilers for Season 2 of Sex Education. Over the past 10 years, the ‘sex-positive’ movement has grown dramatically. The movement advocates for embracing sexuality as an important part of identity and health, regardless of age or social constructs. In other words, it says sex is human, and you’re human, so it’s a healthy part of your life. Educate yourself, and embrace it. Another interesting trend is the growth in sexually transmitted … READ MORE

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    This Story Is About You, But Not For You: A Review of “Made in China”

    February 6th, 2020     by Gelaine Santiago     Comments

    Gelaine Santiago reviews the film Made in China. READ MORE

    “Made In China couldn’t seem to reconcile the nature of telling the story of a Chinese person with its desire to pander to a white audience. Because of that, so much of this film just felt watered down, the way Chinese dishes are removed of spice and heat and history to be made palatable to mainstream consumers.” READ MORE

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    Review: Just Pervs by Jess Taylor

    February 4th, 2020     by Marta Balcewicz     Comments

    When I was a teenager, I was introduced to the books of Charles Bukowski. I had spotted a shelf-full of them at the East Village apartment of someone whose taste and lifestyle I admired. The first Bukowski novel I sought out was Women. Out of all the titles I’d seen on the shelf, this one stood out and seemed the most attractive. I assumed that a book with “women” for a title would offer, at its core, a nuanced study of, well, women. I assumed women would figure prominently in Women, in a way that would appeal to me, a young woman reader. I took Women out of the central library in Mississauga and took it to my bedroom to read READ MORE

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    Barriers in the classroom

    January 29th, 2020     by Anthonella Alvarez     Comments

    Latinx students face unique education challenges that are not being addressed. READ MORE

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    From Student to Stumped: How Graduating Made Me Question My Identity

    November 14th, 2019     by Alexandra Few     Comments

    Let’s throw it all the way back to kindergarten where my biggest accomplishment was correctly tracing the letter ‘e’ (I really celebrated that one). Fast forward to the start of primary school where from grades one to eight, I won the optimism award, the tenth-place ribbon in the hundred-meter dash (I’m not very athletic), and was involved in every school club. After graduating from public school, the next step was high school where I completed … READ MORE

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    When Will We Get the Queer Representation We Deserve?

    September 30th, 2019     by Hailey Orrange     Comments

    It’s always wonderful to see myself, a queer woman, represented in mainstream movies and TV shows, but at what cost? At the overly graphic sex scenes, the lack of racial and gender diversity, and the absence of body inclusivity in the characters and cast? We want representation, yes, but we deserve the kind of representation that is authentic and real: queer people come in all races, body sizes, genders, and abilities. Showcasing only thin, white, feminine-presenting women and calling it “representation” is almost as harmful as not having any representation at all. READ MORE

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    Wah Wah Wah: An Interview with Bilal Baig & Celia Jade Green

    July 31st, 2019     by Jackie Mlotek     Comments

    Warnings: Discussions of sexual harassment I remember the first time I got street harassed. I was 11 years old. A car was parked at a red light and I was crossing the street two minutes away from my parent’s house off of Bathurst Street. The inhabitants screamed at me and made a crude gesture out the window. At that time in my life, I was being fed the idea that attention from boys or men, of … READ MORE

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    The harmful effects of slut-shaming in school

    July 27th, 2019     by Sylvana Poon     Comments

    Content Note: This blog post discusses slut-shaming and mentions sexual violence, rape culture, self-harm, eating disorders, and suicide. READ MORE

    “The first time I was slut-shamed, I was only 13 years old. I did not even realize what it was, I just felt immense shame and humiliation. I was wrongly accused, threatened, punished by school authorities, and ridiculed by my peers — all for sitting on a boy’s lap in a classroom (with other people present).” READ MORE

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